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Traffic Count Methodology and Technology: Response to Survey

A short survey was distributed through Tranlib, a listserv serving transportation librarians and information specialists.  The original questions are represented below in black, and state responses are in red.

State Responses

Alaska

Contact: Matt Murphy
matt.murphy@alaska.gov
907-269-0876

-We have a Short Term Traffic Count operation that uses hose counts, loop counts and some Miovision camera counts for turning movements.  We contract some of the short term counts out and we do some ourselves.  We don’t do very much for pedestrian or non-motorized counts but we typically use the Miovision cameras for pedestrian counts.  We also have a Continuous Count operation using peizos and loops and radar sensors.  We conduct on-going quality control of the data and make site visits to each of our CCS stations on a constant on-going process all year long

-We use GPS but not imbedded in the count files.  We keep the GPS information on field sheets and in our data base

-Installation of all sensors is contracted out.  We do the maintenance after installation is complete and for the lifespan of those sensors.  We do calibration with the contractor immediately after the installation of new sensors and we have on going quality control that we do internally.

-I’d be willing to share all kinds of info about our traffic count management system.  Please feel free to ask.

California

Contact: Cindy Probyl
cindy.pribyl@dot.ca.gov

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle types as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Caltrans Traffic Census Program collects traffic counts manually with hoses, loops and piezos (truck counts 15 bin classifications) manually with traffic counters mostly Peek ADR 1000s, Sabres, ADR 2000s and ADR 3000s for automated communication stations using IP Address, WIFI and Modems.  Also we have some Diamond counters, Phoenix Series, Traffic Tally II and Unicorns used with hose/tubes, loops and piezos (truck counts).  We do not use video for all data collection and we do not collect pedestrian or bike counts.  Our traffic counts are done on a three year rotation cycle, we have 12 districts throughout the State of California which Caltrans divides the count collection cycle by district, county and routes.  We collect continuous counts 365 days per year full time count station, quarterly counts, profile counts, ramp counts, truck counts on three year count cycle.   Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination? Caltrans counts are done in-house.
  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim.  I am not aware of RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  Our state has aging hardware which we are upgrading over time with mostly Diamond and Peek vendor.  Does anyone use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how?  Caltrans District Traffic Census staff are using their cell phones and other instruments for ensuring GPS readings at the count site location.
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor?  At this time, Caltrans Traffic Census staff install, maintenance and calibrate the field equipment.
  • Is there any other information regarding your traffic count management system that you would be willing to share?  The California Department of Transportation is currently in the process of developing a new database system to replace our current existing old Oracle platform database system due to newer technology, FHWA requirements, etc.

Idaho

Contact: Margaret Pridmore
Margaret.Pridmore@itd.idaho.gov
208-334-8221

I was given your name as a contact for this information.  Oregon DOT is interested in finding out the methods neighboring state DOTs use for traffic data collection in short- and long-term traffic counting locations.  We are in the process of migrating to a cloud-based software, and are examining our current hardware, technology and methodology.

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle type as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination?  Short-term counts: We have 3 staff that perform 48 hour counts using either pneumatic tubes or Miovision cameras. We typically only perform manual counts when we are validating our nearly 300 ATR/WIM sites each year (and we try to hit each annually). 
  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Do you use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how? Right now we have quite a few Diamond portable counters. However, we are also looking at replacing some that are significantly old and having issues. I am about to put in a request to purchase 40 mini-TRS units from IRD. We don’t currently use the GPS to ensure that the counter is in the correct location. Whether we decide to use the GPS in the counter or to adapt our internal processes to use GPS from other devices, we do intend to use GPS as a location validation tool in the future.
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor? We don’t currently do much with contractors. However, we are looking to expand our partnerships with local agencies to begin a coordinated collection and reporting effort. We post all of our continuous count info the ArcGIS, as well as our AADT layer. In the near future we are hoping to post our short-term 24+ hours counts to ArcGIS as well.
  • Is there any other information regarding your traffic count management system that you would be willing to share? If I can answer any other questions, please don’t hesitate to give me a call or send me an email.

 

Florida

Contact: Joey Gordon
850-414-4005
Joey.Gordon@dot.state.fl.us

Florida DOT has approximately 18,000 + short-term counters which are deployed statewide by our 8 geographic districts, covering the entire program using a 3-year cycle, counting about 1/3 per year.  These are primarily combinations of road-tube counters and what we refer to as PTMS’s, which are permanently installed loops & sensors with a cabinet on the shoulder to deploy short-term counters.  These short-term counts are managed by the districts and the data is uploaded to our DB2 database (TCI) through Survey Processing Software (SPS), developed by Northrop Grumman.  All of the districts except District 2 use contracts with vendors for the data collection, District 2 uses FDOT staff.  A variety of equipment is used and the districts are required to submit a count schedule and proof of certification of each unit to me no later than January 31st of each year prior to beginning their data collection for that year.

For our continuous counters, the Central Office in Tallahassee oversees the installation, maintenance and operation of 300 + sites, of which 40 + are Weigh-in-Motion (WIM).  This is done jointly by FDOT staff and our contractors, Southern Traffic Service and Marlin Engineering.  All sites are polling nightly, starting at approximately 12:15 am, and the data is loaded locally to our Oracle tables.  We have separate tables for volume, classification, speed and WIM data.  We currently use equipment from PEEK, Diamond, IRD and QFREE.  The entire system is called Traffic Polling & Analysis System (TPAS), which does the polling, convert/load, Quality Control, End-of-Year Processing, and reporting of data to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).  This system was also developed by Northrop Grumman.  These sites are inspected and certified annually by our consultant.

We have initiated a contract with MS2 of Ann Arbor, Michigan to privide a software solution called Traffic Data Management System (TDMS) to replace TPAS.  It is an Amazon cloud-based system and will be public-facing rather than behind the FDOT firewall.  We are mid-stream and using TPAS while we are developing TDMS and should be switching over in Spring of 2020.  MS2 has 20 + states that are using their system and several local entities as well.

Maine

Contact: Deborah Morgan
Deborah.Morgan@maine.gov
207-624-3606

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle types as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination? We perform manual verification counts at our CCS sites (volume and classification).  For those on the Interstate System we may collect 24 video and manually count from the video.  We try to do each site on a three-year cycle.  This work is done in-house.
  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Does anyone use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how? Our short duration tube counters are old.  We use IRD’s Mini TRS for volume counts and Peek’s ADR-1000 for classification counts.  Most of this equipment was purchased in the late 1990’s and early in 2000.  The Peek recorders are no longer supported.  We had planned to release an RFP for new equipment last year, but data management software became a priority.  We have been collecting GPS data for the past 6 years with handheld Garmin units to verify locations and assist with accurately placing counts on our network.  One of our employees looks up each location through Goggle Earth.  We did purchase Jamar’s Black Cat II in 2017 for counting the Interstate system as road tube counters became too dangerous to set.  However, this is length-based classification and our Planning Division needs the 13 category counts.  We will begin looking into a way to convert the 4 length categories to 13.  We still collect the FHWA 13 for all other roads.
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor? Our CCS sites are equipped with TDCs EMU3 counters.  We installed them in 2017/2018.  Although there were a lot of issues to work through, everything is going well now.  These counters employ the latest technology and their functionality far exceeds our older equipment.  Most of the vendors that have been around for a long time are still using the same technology that was in use 20 years ago.  For sites on the Interstate system we’re replacing all volume counters with Wavetronix radar units.  They require little to no maintenance and are not affected by the never-ending road work.  We have manually verified their accuracy.
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor? Until this year most of the installations were done in-house.  However, since our primary Technician was injured, we will be contracting out this work.  We maintain all of our classification and volume sites.  The WIM program contracts all of their installation and maintenance.  The calibration is done in-house in the spring and fall.

Montana
Contact: Becky Duke
bduke@mt.gov
406-444-6122

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle types as well as bicycles.  MDT does manual counts from short-term videos only when needed for project design purposes.  This section only monitors vehicle activities but all videos are available to MDT staff for additional data mining such as bike and pedestrian activity.    
  • We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. MDT’s practice has been to conduct 4-hour verification count against each Continuous Count Stations (CCS) each quarter.  We use Jamar boards which we feel work well.   Our work process is to download per vehicle data from our CCSs each day. This allows staff to monitor the sites more closely to identify drifts or changes in the data.  Quarterly on-site manual counts are still conducted but, due to cuts in staff, these manual counts have been prioritized, i.e. top priority: Volume only CCS in order to collect 4 quarters of vehicle classification data, 2nd priority:  length base sites, classification sites are verified at least once a year or as a data review indicates is necessary.  Staff also perform an inspection of the site including roadway, pull box, counter, phone connection, etc. Pictures are taken and uploaded to Traffic Management system so staff can refer to the information as needed.
  • Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination? MDT uses in house staff for all CCS related work, other than the initial installation of a WIM system.  We hire seasonal staff to supplement our short-term count staff.  In Montana, the MPOs (we have 3) have count programs.  The counts are submitted to MDT’s web-based traffic management system and are QC’d and factored using the same procedures as MDT’s counts.
  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. MDT utilizes Diamond counters for portable and for volume and length-based CCStations.  MDT uses ECM components in WIM sites.  These general work well but we have experiences issues with components locking up.
  • We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Does anyone use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how? Staff have iPads for navigational purposes.  They use the iPads to collect GPS coordinates when placing a short-term counter.  They also use the iPads to take pictures if needed.  The iPads automatically sync with the map when the employee is in a service area.  This allows pictures and other information to be uploaded and available for entire section to review.
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor? MDT uses in house staff for all CCS related work, other than the initial installation of a WIM system.  This includes installation of non-WIM Diamond CCstations, maintenance and calibration of all CCS.
  • Is there any other information regarding your traffic count management system that you would be willing to share? MDT is currently working with our traffic software vendor, MS2, to develop an Equipment Status Tracking System (ESTS) to consolidate our statewide inventory and cost information into a single location.  Goals include ability to better capture and track program costs for budgeting purposes and to quantify impacts of program and staffing cuts. We’re also working with enforcement agencies to train officers and develop reporting tools so they can use utilize 

Nevada

Matthew Hamilton
MHamilton@dot.nv.gov

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle type as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination?

We also perform short term 13 bin classification counts, although we do not count bicycles. Nor do we have cameras.  We are just breaking into that realm of data collection.  We currently conduct 24-hour continuous around the clock manuals. We used to do 48-hour continuous manuals, but it became too taxing on our manpower.
We do manual verifications at all our permanent ATR/AVC/WIM sights every year, or whenever a counter is replaced.
All our data collection is done in-house.

  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Do you use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how?

On the field side, for our short term data collection efforts, we use almost exclusively Diamond Traffic Products.  We jumped ship for a period and switched over to traffic monitoring equipment from JAMAR Technologies.  We later created a Product Evaluation Committee to test and verify the accuracy of data collection equipment prior to purchase and we settled on the Diamond Limited for short term volume counts and classification data (although we have and use a large fleet of Diamond Unicorn, Phoenix, and Pegasus recorders as well).  Unfortunately, the Diamond Limited are not in production any longer, so we tested the Diamond Omega X3 classifier with positive results.  We had some budget issues are were not able to purchase any, but I may still have the raw data that I can forward to you for analysis.
For permanent locations we use the Diamond recorders for volume data, and the iSYNCH from IRD for AVC/WIM data.
We also used Golden River recorders for many years, but we are phasing them out.
As for the processing and reporting software, that is not within my scope of responsibilities.  We used TRADAS from Chaparral Systems for many years, but we recently migrated over to Jackalope from High Dessert.  Christopher Wright cwright@dot.nv.gov is the person to contact about results and satisfaction of that software.
We do not collect GPS data within the count files themselves, as much of our equipment is dated. Our field technicians collect the GPS data with their mobile phones and submit that data separately.  GPS data is not collected during each traffic monitoring session, but only with new location installations or when a site must be relocated.

  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor?

If you are referring to permanent installations (ATR/AVC/WIM), they are all done by contractors now.  I spent many years doing such installs so if you have any specific questions in that regard, I may be able to help.
Any maintenance is done by our crew.  We have district close the lane(s) and we perform the work (epoxy, patch work, splicing, etc).  If the affected site is in too high of a volume area such as Las Vegas or Reno, we usually suspend the site until a contract comes through and replaces the equipment.
Maintenance and repairs on permanent or short term are all done by our electronics section, as well as any communication or networking issues.

  • Is there any other information regarding your traffic count management system that you would be willing to share?

Please feel free to contact me if you have any further questions.

‚ÄčNew Jersey

Contact: Antoun Abraham
Antoun.Abraham@dot.nj.gov
(609) 963-1911

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle type as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination?

Answer:  There are about (6,000) sample locations of short-term coverage counts shall be monitored on a three-year cycle with approximately one-third of these sample locations to be monitored each calendar year. The type of the collected data varies between 48-hour volume counts, 48-hour vehicle classification counts, one continuous seven (7) days of volume counts. In addition, there are approximately (76) major stations statewide collect Volume and Classification data monthly on seven (7) days duration. The type of equipment used are Automatic Traffic Recorders (ATRs) and Automatic vehicle Classification (AVCs) Counters using portable pneumatic tubes. We rely completely on automated counts using ATR and AVC equipment. All the short-term coverage counts are out-sourced by consulting firms statewide. Also, we use approximately (95) permanent weigh-in-Motion (WIM) sites and approximately (45) Traffic Volume permanent sites statewide. The WIM sites collect (13) categories of FHWA vehicle classification system, and the (TVS) sites collect volumes only. The consultants use manual handheld electronic board counters for intersection counts special studies. Also, manual counters, video technology as well as (WIM) sits are used during the calibration process of the (ATR, AVC) equipment used.

  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Do you use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how?

Answer:  Our consulting firms who perform the short-term coverage count program are using Metro Count and JAMAR Technologies, we are satisfied with the results of both technologies. Yes, our consultants use GPS readings and record the Longitude and the latitudes of each site location they perform. In addition, they indicate the MP of the roadway being counted as well as, the exact location of the site described between two side streets crossing the roadway.

We have been testing a non-intrusive solutions. DataCollect equipment looked promising (https://www.datacollect.com/).  We are planning to establish no-intrusive continuous volume stations using solar technologies and wireless modems on lower functional roads.  

  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor?

Answer:  All installation, Maintenance and calibration of the field equipment are owned and done by the consultants.

  • Is there any other information regarding your traffic count management system that you would be willing to share?

Answer: The traffic counting program is designed to utilize, at a minimum, 48-hour short-term counts to produce estimate of Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT). Traffic counts are taken in all type of public roads statewide and cover all functional classification of the state’s roadway system. The Bureau of Transportation Data and Support is responsible for administering NJDOT’s Traffic Monitoring program, which is in compliance with Federal regulations and guidelines, the program includes the collection, processing, summarization, and reporting of traffic count data along New Jersey’s roadways. NJDOT maintains this Traffic Monitoring program consisting of continuous and short-term elements. Both of these elements are conducted in accordance with the FHWA Traffic Monitoring Guide (TMG) and the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Guidelines for Traffic Data Programs.

Texas
Contact: Catherine Wolff
Catherine.Wolff@txdot.gov
512-486-5124

  1. Short-term data collection – Manual counts
    1. TxDOT’s manual counts for FHWA 13 Classification are performed solely by contractors using video data collection (for 24 hours) and then visually counted for the axle-based scheme.  Over the past couple of years, we increased the number of annual counts from 800 to 1,000 each.  We are currently working on a supplemental contract to increase our annual total to 1,600 each. 
    2. The increase in the number of counts has/will occur(red) mainly in the urbanized areas, where in-road sensors to collect axle-classification is not possible/practical.
    3. As with Oregon, Texas also performs some verification counts at permanent sites.  In some locations, particularly at WIM sites, we also have a permanent classification/volume site collecting the same traffic stream for comparison/verification.
    4. During a previous contract bid, a vendor bid stating that they could provide the FHWA 13 through video processing software.  However, evidence indicated that they were going to use length-based vehicle classification and extrapolate the FHWA 13 using statistical information from previous years’ data (public information).
  2. Short-term data collection – Pneumatic tube counts
    1. The overwhelming majority of the annual pneumatic tube counts are performed by contract personnel.  TxDOT maintains a small inventory of equipment for “special counts” where a quick turnaround is required.  The special counts are performed by in-house personnel.
    2. The in-house equipment inventory is Diamond Traffic Products’ Unicorn model, which is no longer available.  We found the Unicorn to be both reliable, durable, and accurate.  The current model is the OMEGA-X3.  The weblink is http://diamondtraffic.com/product/X3    
    3. TxDOT developed and uses an off-the-shelf system to collect data that incorporates bar coding for the station information and a standard tube counter that produces a standard printer (PRN) file.  The developed system uses the Trimble Nomad, through a template that captures bar coding, GPS, and contractor/TxDOT inspector information.  Once the Trimble and data files are paired up via a common key, the data is screened using 29 pre-defined data error checks.  For example, stations are reviewed to verify that the actual GPS collection points are within 500 feet of the original map location. 
  3. Permanent traffic data collection
    1. Installation and maintenance is performed with both in-house and contractor personnel.  Where contracts are available, TxDOT provides technical assistance.
    2. Calibration of the weigh-in-motion (WIM) equipment is performed with in-house personnel, a 78,600 pound tractor-trailer combination, and a loaded Class 5 dump truck, when available.
  4. In 2014, TxDOT successfully implemented the Statewide Traffic Analysis and Reporting System (STARS II) hosted by Midwestern Software Solutions (MS2), which is an Internet cloud-based solution with centralized, relational database.  Implementation of the system improved business process efficiencies and data accessibility and accuracy.

Washington

Contact: Joe St. Charles
StCharJ@wsdot.wa.gov
360-570-2381

  • Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle types as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. once every three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination?Almost all of our short duration traffic counts are done with tubes.  These are set from around Monday noon to Friday noon.We do short-term manual counts to capture vehicle classification at needed locations where such classification can’t be performed with tube counts.  These are a set of three counts (6:00-10:00, 10:00-2:00, and 2:00-6:00) done in the same week that we then expand from 12 to 24 hours using factors developed at tube count and ATR locations.  We do manual verifications of our ATRs roughly once per year. All manual and tube counts are done using our own staff.  We use the FHWA 13-bin scheme (actually, 13 bins plus an error bin and an unknown bin); we only include bicycles for special purpose counts.
  • Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Does anyone use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how? We are using Diamond Traffic Products hardware for both our tube counters and most of our ATRs.  We also employ IRD counters at ATR locations we need vehicle weights.  Manual count boards are from JAMAR Technologies.  We have one Wavetronics ATR, which is capturing vehicle volumes with a reasonable degree of accuracy, but we have found that this equipment is very limited in the locations it can be installed if data accuracy is a concern.  We are also currently investigating CLR Analytics’ magnetic loop signature technology, which has the potential for greater classification accuracy without the need for piezos (it is likely that we will begin purchasing this technology in the near future). We are not currently using GPS readings to validate count locations, but as a result of your question I have asked our data processors to look into this.I believe we are more or less satisfied with our vendors, although IRD’s recent refusal to allow our processing vendor (MS2) to directly poll IRD hardware has been a source of frustration.  If you would like an in-depth assessment of our hardware, I suggest you contact Nghia Chau, who is the head of the group that purchases and maintains this equipment.  ChauN@wsdot.wa.gov 
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor? In house.
  • Is there any other information regarding your traffic count management system that you would be willing to share?I would be happy to answer any questions you or your team have at your convenience.  My number is 360-570-2381.

Wyoming

Contact: Chad Mathews
chad.mathews@wyo.gov
307-777-4190

  •  Currently, we use employees to do manual counts from our short-term location videos using 13 classification of vehicle types as well as bicycles.  We also do manual verification counts on the permanent ATRs/Continuous Counters via video approx. onceevery three years – with occasional on-site manual counts at these permanent stations. Does your department use similar methods, or do you rely completely on automated counts?  Are your counts done in-house or out-sourced? Or with a combination? Wyoming currently uses pneumatic tubes for short term counts, they collect volume and class (13 classes) in rural areas.  Our urban count program does not get classification.  We do use manual counts to check ATRs on a 3 yr cycle.  
  •  Much of our hardware is aging to the point that the vendors are no longer supporting the platforms.  We are aware of the recent RAC survey on Short-Term Traffic Counts and the 2013 survey on Traffic Count Data Software.  We would appreciate knowing specifically what equipment your agency uses, and how satisfied you are with the results. We recognize that much of that was covered in the 2013 study, but want to see how the technology has changed in the interim. Does anyone use GPS readings in the count files to ensure counts are in the right location? If so, how? We use diamond products to collect data almost exclusively and High Desert Traffic provides our data management system (jackalope) 
  • Is the installation, maintenance and calibration of the field equipment done in-house, or through a contractor? All in house